Vessel on pedestal foot

  • Earthenware with red pigment
  • 31.5 x 25 cm
  • Possibly Ban Chiang culture
  • 300 BCE-200C.E., Prehistoric period
  • Origin: Northeast Thailand
  • Gift of Victor and Takako Hauge
  • S2004.45

Description

Earthenware pedestaled vessel with red painted spiral designs with constricted neck and slightly flaring rim.

Curatorial Remarks

1. (Ellen Chase, Louise Cort, and Blythe McCarthy, 6 May 2003) This vessel has a "dish" mouth similar to that of S2004.44.  Is it a modern fake in its entirety? It should be considered for TL testing.

A similarity in the precise painting can be seen on an excavated Late Period (ca. 300 B.C.–1 A.D.) Ban Chiang vessel, no. 54 in the 1982 Ban Chiang exhibition catalogue (White 1982, no. 54).

White, Joyce C. 1982. Ban Chiang: Discovery of a Lost Bronze Age. Philadelphia and Washington: University Museum, University of Pennsylvania Press and Smithsonian Institution.

2. (Louise Cort, 7 November 2003) The zigzag decor on the neck corresponds to that on the neck of a round-bodied pot excavated from Burial 23/11 at Ban Chiang, dated to the Late Period, ca. 300 B.C.–A.D. 1 (White 1982, no. 55).

White, Joyce C. 1982. Ban Chiang: Discovery of a Lost Bronze Age. Philadelphia and Washington: University Museum, University of Pennsylvania Press and Smithsonian Institution.

3. (Louise Cort, 10 November 2003) Another jar of the same shape, with distinctive "overhanging" neck, golden-orange body, and thin painted designs of spirals on the body and a wide zigzag on the neck, is in the collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (Asian Art Museum of San Francisco ed. 1993, no. 5; h. 27.0 cm).

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, ed. 1993. Thai Ceramics: The James and Elaine Connell Collection. Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press.

4. (Louise Cort, 10 November 2003) In his study of types of Ban Chiang painted pottery, Piriya Krairiksh illustrates in Chart IV a vessel of this type excavated in burial WP1C (at the Wat Po site in Ban Chiang).

Piriya Krairiksh. 1973. "Provisional Classification of Painted Pottery from Bân Chieng." Artibus Asiae XXXV(1–2): 145–162.

5. (Joyce White, Ban Chiang Project, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology, 8 December 2003) Authentic Ban Chiang pots can be even more intensely orange in color. But this appears to be made up of an old rim, a new body, and an old foot. On the body, the red pigment is painted right over fire-clouds from firing, whereas it should appear under such firing marks. The vessel is not as heavy as she expected. The rim doesn't make sense with the body, which is of the wrong proportions. The same design appears on a Ban Chiang transitional vessel (White 1982, no. 59).

White, Joyce C. 1982. Ban Chiang: Discovery of a Lost Bronze Age. Philadelphia and Washington: University Museum, University of Pennsylvania Press and Smithsonian Institution.


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