Ceramics in Mainland Southeast Asia:
Collections in the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Print | Back to Normal Layout

Jar with two vertical lugs

  • Stoneware with iron glaze
  • 10.2 x 9.5 cm
  • Maenam Noi ware
  • 16th-18th century, Ayutthaya period
  • Origin: Maenam Noi kilns, Singburi, Singburi province, Central Thailand
  • Gift of Osborne and Gratia Hauge, and Victor and Takako Hauge
  • S2005.327

Description

Jar with short vertical neck, ovoid body, two vertical lugs attached below neck, flat string-cut base.
Clay: brown stoneware.
Glaze: iron glaze.
Decoration: none.

Curatorial Remarks

1. (Louise Cort, 17 July 2002) Si Satchanalai or Singburi (note the special shape of the lugs and the brown clay, both suggesting Singburi).

2. (Louise Cort, 1 July 2003) The medium-brown clay body, the dull brown glaze, and the ornamental lugs, set vertically, suggest an origin in the Tao Maenam Noi (Singburi) kilns.

3. (Louise Cort, 19 January 2006) These wares are commonly discussed as "Singburi ware," after the province where they were made, but the kiln group that produced them is known more specifically as the Maenam Noi kiln group, after the river along which the kilns were located. Changed Ware from Singburi ware to Maenam Noi ware.

4. (George Williams, research assistant, 30 January 2007) In anticipation of the upcoming exhibition, Taking Shape, and to reflect current understanding, changed Date from 15th–16th century to 15th–17th century.

5. (Louise Cort, 24 March 2007) Fragments of Maenam Noi ware jars with four lugs, basins, and small mortars, together with necks of underfired stoneware jars (identified as earthenware), were recovered from shallow water about 100 meters off the shore of Ojika island, at the northern end of the Goto island chain west of Kyushu. (The islands belong to Nagasaki prefecture.) The site, named Karamisaki, is a promontory protecting the harbor located just below the former castle site on the island. From 1152 through 1868, the island formed part of the domain of the Matsuura warrior house, based in Hirado. According to a map dated 1718 in the Matsuura History Museum in Hirado, Ojika island lay along the route of Chinese merchant ships bound for Nagasaki. Six Chinese-style stone anchors have been recovered on the island. The Maenam Noi jars correspond in mouth form to such jars recovered from other Japanese sites dating to the second half of the 16th century or early 17th century. Mixed with the Maenam Noi ceramics were Thai earthenware lids and portable stoves, a Chinese stoneware jar and Chinese blue-and-white porcelain (types dating to the second half of the 16th century), and 19th century Hizen porcelain from Hasami. The ceramics were recovered from a shallows made treacherous by swift tides and probably represent the remains of one or more shipwrecks.   

Hayashida Kenzo, and Tsukabara Hiroshi, eds. 2002. Yamamioki kaitei iseki (Yamamioki underwater site), Ojika-cho bunkazai chōsa hōkokusho 16. Fukuoka and Ojika-cho: Kyushu-Okinawa Suichū Kōkogaku Kyōkai [Kyushu-Okinawa Underwater Archaeology Association] and Ojika-cho Kyōiku Iinkai [Ojika Town Board of Education].

6. (Louise Cort, 4 February 2008) In the course of his analysis of black-glazed jars from the Sawankhalok and Maenam Noi kilns, Mukai also notes that the other types of Maenam Noi wares—black-glazed or unglazed bottles and bowls—first appear in early 16th century contexts.

Changed Date from 15th–17th century to 16th–18th century.

Mukai Kou. 2003. "Tai kokkatsuyū shijiko no bunrui to nendai (The Study on Brown Glazed Storage Jars, exported from Thailand)." Bōeki Tōji Kenkyū (Trade Ceramics Studies) 23: 90–105 (Japanese), 161 (English summary).

7. (Louise Cort, 29 May 2008) In Washington to deliver the Pope Memorial Lecture, Don Hein observed that "pinched" vertical lugs such as appear on this jar are associated with MON wares from Sawankhalok kilns.


field notes

Submit Comment 0 comments total
 

No field notes found.